Preventing excessive weight gain pregnancy-

Metrics details. Excessive gestational weight gain GWG leads to obstetric complications, maternal postpartum weight retention and an increased risk of offspring obesity. The GeliS study examines the effect of a lifestyle intervention during pregnancy on the proportion of women with excessive GWG and pregnancy and obstetric complications, as well as the long-term risk of maternal and infant obesity. The GeliS study is a cluster-randomised multicentre controlled trial including women with a pre-pregnancy BMI between In the intervention regions, four lifestyle counselling sessions covering a balanced healthy diet, regular physical activity and self-monitoring of weight gain were performed by trained healthcare providers alongside routine pre- and postnatal practice visits.

Preventing excessive weight gain pregnancy

Preventing excessive weight gain pregnancy

Preventing excessive weight gain pregnancy

Preventing excessive weight gain pregnancy

Preventing excessive weight gain pregnancy

Conclusions In the setting of routine prenatal care, lifestyle advice given by trained Preventing excessive weight gain pregnancy providers was not successful in limiting GWG. Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol. Nutr Rev. To our knowledge, there is no other trial to date that has investigated the compatibility of an additional lifestyle advisory component within routine healthcare for pregnant women to such a large extent. Inadequate, adequate and excessive GWG is defined according to the criteria provided by the U. Obesity—Before, During, and Beyond Pregnancy. Diet or exercise, or both, for preventing excessive weight gain in pregnancy. External Prevalence and characteristics associated with gestational weight gain adequacy.

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The risk of low gestational weight gain was statistically significantly increased among low-risk women in the exercise intervention group RR 1. Sixty-five randomized controlled trials were included in this review, of weihht 49 studies enrolling 11, women contributed data to quantitative meta-analysis. Nicholas P. World Health Statistics. By entering your email, you are subscribing Preventing excessive weight gain pregnancy Michelle Marie's personal and promotional marketing email list. Preventing excessive gestational weight gain among African American women: A randomized clinical trial. The exercise interventions were most often of moderate intensity and involving regular walking, dance Preventing excessive weight gain pregnancy aerobic classes. Any intervention for preventing excessive weight gain in pregnancy using diet, exercise, or both, compared with standard or routine care for preventing excessive weight gain in pregnancy. A literature review—part 2. A large proportion of women gain more weight than is recommended during pregnancy. Women's experiences of dietary advice and dietary changes during pregnancy. Findings We included 65 randomised controlled trials, of which 49 trials involving wight, women contributed data. No long-term data on childhood weight were available. You What milf hunter sleep better, have more energy.

The amount of weight you gain during pregnancy is important for the health of your pregnancy and for the long-term health of you and your baby.

  • The amount of weight you gain during pregnancy is important for the health of your pregnancy and for the long-term health of you and your baby.
  • Pregnancy weight gain is something that every woman is concerned with.
  • In women who are normal weight before pregnancy a weight gain of 26 to 35 pounds during pregnancy is ideal.
  • If the address matches an existing account you will receive an email with instructions to reset your password.
  • This document has been produced by the World Health Organization.

The amount of weight you gain during pregnancy is important for the health of your pregnancy and for the long-term health of you and your baby. Learn about pregnancy weight gain recommendations and steps you can take to meet your pregnancy weight gain goal. How much weight you should gain during pregnancy is based on your body mass index BMI before pregnancy. BMI is a measure of body fat calculated from weight and height.

Calculate your BMI and weight category using your weight before you became pregnant:. Flash Player 9 is required. Body mass index-specific weight gains associated with optimal birth weights in twin pregnancies.

J Reprod Med. Source: National Vital Statistics System birth data. Gaining less than the recommended amount of weight in pregnancy is associated with delivering a baby who is too small. Some babies born too small may have difficulty starting breastfeeding, may be at increased risk for illness, and may experience developmental delays not meeting the milestones for his or her age.

Gaining more than the recommended amount of weight in pregnancy is associated with having a baby who is born too large, which can lead to delivery complications, cesarean delivery, and obesity during childhood.

Gaining more than the recommended amount of weight can also increase the amount of weight you hold on to after pregnancy, which can lead to obesity. Top of Page. CDC conducts surveillance using data from the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System , the National Vital Statistics System , and other sources to monitor the prevalence and trends of women meeting pregnancy weight gain recommendations. CDC also conducts research to understand health risks associated with too much or too little weight gain during pregnancy to inform future pregnancy weight gain guidelines.

Current activities include examining the quality of prepregnancy weight and pregnancy weight gain data, the role of provider advice in helping women to meet pregnancy weight gain recommendations, as well as identifying strategies that can help women achieve pregnancy weight gain within recommendations.

Reproductive Health. Section Navigation. On This Page. External Prevalence and characteristics associated with gestational weight gain adequacy. Obesity—Before, During, and Beyond Pregnancy. Association of maternal body mass index, excessive weight gain, and gestational diabetes mellitus with large-for-gestational-age births. Reliability of gestational weight gain reported postpartum: a comparison to the birth certificate.

External Excess gestational weight gain is associated with child adiposity among mothers with normal and overweight prepregnancy weight status. External Newborn size among obese women with weight gain outside the Institute of Medicine recommendation. Get E-mail Updates.

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If the address matches an existing account you will receive an email with instructions to retrieve your username. Additional outcomes Mean gestational weight gain was lower in the intervention group in low-risk populations MD Pregnancy Nutrition Guide. Implementation of pregnancy weight management and obesity guidelines: a meta-synthesis of healthcare professionals' barriers and facilitators using the Theoretical Domains Framework. Apr

Preventing excessive weight gain pregnancy

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How much weight you should gain during pregnancy is based on your body mass index BMI before pregnancy. BMI is a measure of body fat calculated from weight and height. Calculate your BMI and weight category using your weight before you became pregnant:. Flash Player 9 is required. Body mass index-specific weight gains associated with optimal birth weights in twin pregnancies.

J Reprod Med. Source: National Vital Statistics System birth data. Gaining less than the recommended amount of weight in pregnancy is associated with delivering a baby who is too small. Some babies born too small may have difficulty starting breastfeeding, may be at increased risk for illness, and may experience developmental delays not meeting the milestones for his or her age.

Gaining more than the recommended amount of weight in pregnancy is associated with having a baby who is born too large, which can lead to delivery complications, cesarean delivery, and obesity during childhood. Gaining more than the recommended amount of weight can also increase the amount of weight you hold on to after pregnancy, which can lead to obesity. Top of Page. CDC conducts surveillance using data from the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System , the National Vital Statistics System , and other sources to monitor the prevalence and trends of women meeting pregnancy weight gain recommendations.

CDC also conducts research to understand health risks associated with too much or too little weight gain during pregnancy to inform future pregnancy weight gain guidelines. Current activities include examining the quality of prepregnancy weight and pregnancy weight gain data, the role of provider advice in helping women to meet pregnancy weight gain recommendations, as well as identifying strategies that can help women achieve pregnancy weight gain within recommendations.

Reproductive Health. Section Navigation. We grouped studies according to the types of interventions, and according to the types of participants, i.

We included 65 randomised controlled trials, of which 49 trials involving 11, women contributed data. Twenty studies were at a moderate-to high- risk of bias. The diets tested were low sugar low glycaemic load , diabetic, low-calorie or low-fat diets, with or without food diaries and regular weighing.

The exercise interventions were most often of moderate intensity and involving regular walking, dance or aerobic classes.

The comparison or control group generally received standard care. We considered this evidence to be high-quality. There was a tendency for supervised exercise-only interventions to reduce macrosomia too.

Maternal hypertension high blood pressure was also reduced with the interventions. We found no clear differences between study groups with regard to most infant complications, except that for high- risk women the babies born to the women in the intervention group were less likely to experience breathing difficulties respiratory distress syndrome than babies in the control group.

This evidence was mostly of a moderate quality. The studies had differences in the types of interventions, types of participants for example in terms of body mass index BMI , number of previous pregnancies and age , delivery of the intervention whether the intervention was incorporated into antenatal visits or delivered separately by a dietician , timing of the measurements, timing of commencement of the intervention first, second or third trimester , the intensity of the intervention , and how it was monitored or supervised.

Most included studies were carried out in developed countries and it is not clear whether these results are widely applicable to lower income settings. We found high-quality evidence that diet or exercise interventions, or both, help to reduce excessive weight gain in pregnancy.

They may also reduce caesarean deliveries, especially with combined diet and exercise interventions, and maternal hypertension. In addition, the chances of having a baby over 4 kg and the chances of the newborn having breathing difficulties after birth may be reduced, especially in overweight and obese women.

Moderate-intensity exercise appears to be an important part of weight- control strategies in pregnancy; however, more research is needed on side-effects to inform safe guidelines. High-quality evidence indicates that diet or exercise, or both, during pregnancy can reduce the risk of excessive GWG.

Other benefits may include a lower risk of caesarean delivery, macrosomia, and neonatal respiratory morbidity , particularly for high- risk women receiving combined diet and exercise interventions. Maternal hypertension may also be reduced.

Exercise appears to be an important part of controlling weight gain in pregnancy and more research is needed to establish safe guidelines. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in , Issue 4. Excessive weight gain during pregnancy is associated with poor maternal and neonatal outcomes including gestational diabetes, hypertension , caesarean section , macrosomia, and stillbirth.

Diet or exercise interventions, or both, may reduce excessive gestational weight gain GWG and associated poor outcomes; however, evidence from the original review was inconclusive. To evaluate the effectiveness of diet or exercise, or both, interventions for preventing excessive weight gain during pregnancy and associated pregnancy complications. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register 5 November , contacted investigators of the previously identified ongoing studies and scanned reference lists of retrieved studies.

Randomised controlled trials RCTs of diet or exercise, or both, interventions for preventing excessive weight gain in pregnancy. Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias , extracted data and checked them for accuracy. We organised RCTs according to the type of interventions and pooled data using the random-effects model in the Review Manager software. We also performed subgroup analyses according to the initial risk of adverse effects related to poor weight control.

Jump to navigation. A large proportion of women gain more weight than is recommended during pregnancy. Excessive weight gain in pregnancy is associated with complications such as diabetes, high blood pressure, caesarean section , and large babies.

This review aimed to determine whether diet or exercise measures,or both, could prevent excessive gestational weight gain GWG , and if they were safe. How we conducted the review. This is an update of a review first published in and is current to November and included randomised controlled trials RCTs only in the updated review.

We grouped studies according to the types of interventions, and according to the types of participants, i. We included 65 randomised controlled trials, of which 49 trials involving 11, women contributed data. Twenty studies were at a moderate-to high- risk of bias.

The diets tested were low sugar low glycaemic load , diabetic, low-calorie or low-fat diets, with or without food diaries and regular weighing. The exercise interventions were most often of moderate intensity and involving regular walking, dance or aerobic classes. The comparison or control group generally received standard care. We considered this evidence to be high-quality. There was a tendency for supervised exercise-only interventions to reduce macrosomia too.

Maternal hypertension high blood pressure was also reduced with the interventions. We found no clear differences between study groups with regard to most infant complications, except that for high- risk women the babies born to the women in the intervention group were less likely to experience breathing difficulties respiratory distress syndrome than babies in the control group.

This evidence was mostly of a moderate quality. The studies had differences in the types of interventions, types of participants for example in terms of body mass index BMI , number of previous pregnancies and age , delivery of the intervention whether the intervention was incorporated into antenatal visits or delivered separately by a dietician , timing of the measurements, timing of commencement of the intervention first, second or third trimester , the intensity of the intervention , and how it was monitored or supervised.

Most included studies were carried out in developed countries and it is not clear whether these results are widely applicable to lower income settings. We found high-quality evidence that diet or exercise interventions, or both, help to reduce excessive weight gain in pregnancy.

They may also reduce caesarean deliveries, especially with combined diet and exercise interventions, and maternal hypertension. In addition, the chances of having a baby over 4 kg and the chances of the newborn having breathing difficulties after birth may be reduced, especially in overweight and obese women.

Moderate-intensity exercise appears to be an important part of weight- control strategies in pregnancy; however, more research is needed on side-effects to inform safe guidelines. High-quality evidence indicates that diet or exercise, or both, during pregnancy can reduce the risk of excessive GWG.

Other benefits may include a lower risk of caesarean delivery, macrosomia, and neonatal respiratory morbidity , particularly for high- risk women receiving combined diet and exercise interventions. Maternal hypertension may also be reduced. Exercise appears to be an important part of controlling weight gain in pregnancy and more research is needed to establish safe guidelines.

This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in , Issue 4. Excessive weight gain during pregnancy is associated with poor maternal and neonatal outcomes including gestational diabetes, hypertension , caesarean section , macrosomia, and stillbirth. Diet or exercise interventions, or both, may reduce excessive gestational weight gain GWG and associated poor outcomes; however, evidence from the original review was inconclusive.

To evaluate the effectiveness of diet or exercise, or both, interventions for preventing excessive weight gain during pregnancy and associated pregnancy complications. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register 5 November , contacted investigators of the previously identified ongoing studies and scanned reference lists of retrieved studies.

Randomised controlled trials RCTs of diet or exercise, or both, interventions for preventing excessive weight gain in pregnancy. Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias , extracted data and checked them for accuracy.

We organised RCTs according to the type of interventions and pooled data using the random-effects model in the Review Manager software.

We also performed subgroup analyses according to the initial risk of adverse effects related to poor weight control. We performed sensitivity analysis to assess the robustness of the findings.

Twenty studies were at moderate-to-high risk of bias. Study interventions involved mainly diet only, exercise only, and combined diet and exercise interventions, usually compared with standard care. Study methods varied widely; therefore, we estimated the average effect across studies and performed sensitivity analysis , where appropriate, by excluding outliers and studies at high risk of bias.

This estimate was robust to sensitivity analysis , which reduced heterogeneity , therefore we graded this evidence as high-quality. Interventions involving low glycaemic load diets, supervised or unsupervised exercise only, or diet and exercise combined all led to similar reductions in the number of women gaining excessive weight in pregnancy. Women receiving diet or exercise, or both interventions were more likely to experience low GWG than those in control groups average RR 1.

We found no difference between intervention and control groups with regard to pre-eclampsia RR 0. There was no clear difference between groups with regard to caesarean delivery overall RR 0. We found no difference between groups with regard to preterm birth overall average RR 0. We found no clear difference between intervention and control groups with regard to infant macrosomia average RR 0. The largest effect size occurred in the supervised exercise-only intervention group RR 0.

There were no differences in the risk of poor neonatal outcomes including shoulder dystocia, neonatal hypoglycaemia, hyperbilirubinaemia, or birth trauma all moderate-quality evidence between intervention and control groups; however, infants of high- risk women had a reduced risk of respiratory distress syndrome if their mothers were in the intervention group RR 0.

Diet and exercise interventions for preventing excessive weight gain during pregnancy The issue A large proportion of women gain more weight than is recommended during pregnancy. How we conducted the review This is an update of a review first published in and is current to November and included randomised controlled trials RCTs only in the updated review. Findings We included 65 randomised controlled trials, of which 49 trials involving 11, women contributed data.

Conclusions We found high-quality evidence that diet or exercise interventions, or both, help to reduce excessive weight gain in pregnancy. Authors' conclusions:. Search strategy:. Selection criteria:. Data collection and analysis:. Main results:. You may also be interested in: Interventions to reduce weight gain in schizophrenia Trials of interventions for pregnant women who are obese to lose weight and improve pregnancy outcomes.

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Preventing excessive weight gain pregnancy

Preventing excessive weight gain pregnancy